Book Description

Review The ultimate chronicler of twentieth-century man?s consciousness and anxiety. (William Golding)As comical, satirical, atmospherical an ?entertainment? as he has given us. (The Daily Telegraph, London) Read more About the Author Graham Greene (1904-1991), whose long life nearly spanned the length of the twentieth century, was one of its greatest novelists. Educated at?Berkhamsted?School?and?Balliol?College,?Oxford, he started his career as a sub-editor of the?London?Times.?He began to attract notice as a novelist with his fourth book,?Orient Express,?in 1932. In 1935, he trekked across northern?Liberia, his first experience in?Africa, told in?A Journey Without Maps?(1936). He converted to Catholicism in 1926, an edifying decision, and reported on religious persecution in?Mexico?in 1938 in?The Lawless Roads,?which served as a background for his famous?The Power and the Glory, one of several ?Catholic? novels (Brighton?Rock,?The Heart of the Matter,?The End of the Affair).?During the war he worked for the British secret service in Sierra Leone; afterward, he began wide-ranging travels as a journalist, which were reflected in novels such as?The Quiet American,?Our Man in Havana,?The Comedians,?Travels with My Aunt,?The Honorary Consul,?The Human Factor,?Monsignor Quixote,?and?The Captain and the Enemy.?As well as his many novels, Graham Greene wrote several collections of short stories, four travel books, six plays, two books of autobiography,?A Sort of Life?and?Ways of Escape, two biographies, and four books for children. He also contributed hundreds of essays and film and book reviews to?The Spectator?and other journals, many of which appear in the late collection?Reflections.?Most of his novels have been filmed, including?The Third Man, which the author first wrote as a film treatment. Graham Greene was named Companion of Honour and received the Order of Merit among numerous other awards.Christopher Hitchens is a widely published polemicist and frequent radio and TV commentator.? He is the author of many books, including Why Orwell Matters, Letters to a Young Contrarian, The Trial of Henry Kissinger, as well as books on Cyprus, Kurdistan and Palestine, including Blaming the Victims coedited with Edward Said.? He is a contributing editor to Vanity Fair and writes for, among others, Slate, The Atlantic Monthly, The New York Times Book Review, and The Washington Post.? He lives with his family in Washington, D.C. Read more

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