Book Description

Amazon.com Review Five Frogs on a Log is a practical and easy-to-absorb manual for corporate leaders facing those intense periods of total transformation that seem--for better or for worse--to define today's business world. Written by Mark L. Feldman and Michael F. Spratt, both partners and managing directors of PricewaterhouseCoooper's global M&A consulting division, the book aims to help managers through the 'jolts, curves, and emotional potholes' that inevitably accompany such large-scale restructuring. 'The high-priced bankers and lawyers exit with the close,' they write, 'leaving management to confront the challenge of producing results that justify the price, the added risk, and/or the significant disruption to current operations. To complicate matters, they face what amounts to a new company and a set of unexpected demands that can easily divert them from capturing the value that drove the deal.' With help from insightful illustrations and quotations from those who have been there, Feldman and Spratt build upon their basic theory--that speed is of the essence in corporate upheavals of this type--by offering pragmatic solutions for the myriad problems that invariably arise. --Howard Rothman --This text refers to an alternate Hardcover edition. Read more From Booklist Last summer the merger of Coopers & Lybrand and Price Waterhouse created the world's largest professional services firm. Feldman and Spratt are both directors and partners in this new firm's mergers and acquisitions consulting business. Their insights, therefore, come not only from their professional expertise but also from firsthand experience. The authors argue that most mergers and acquisitions fail because those responsible are not decisive enough and do not act fast enough to integrate what had previously been separate and distinct entities. Just as important, they do not focus on activities that create shareholder value. In their practice, Feldman and Spratt utilize a trademarked technique called 'The Accelerated Transition.' Here they rely on colorful characters, such as the five frogs, and folksy stories to lay out the principles behind the technique. Underneath the homespun veneer, though, lie tactics that may seem ruthless and wisdom that is anything but conventional. David Rouse --This text refers to an alternate Hardcover edition. Read more See all Editorial Reviews

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